Alcohol Treatment

Alcohol Treatment Options

Patients receiving treatment for alcohol addictionare usually expected to travel to a treatment facility for treatment sessions.

Addiction Treatment

Alcohol Addiction Treatment Options

Patients receiving treatment for alcohol addictionare usually expected to travel to a treatment facility for treatment sessions.Treatment for alcohol addiction may begin with a program of detoxification. You may need to take sedating medications to prevent shaking, confusion or hallucination (delirium tremens) or other withdrawal symptoms.

Common medical problems related to alcohol addiction are high blood pressure, increased blood sugar, liver disease and heart disease.

Additional Treatments

Additional Treatments for Alcohol Addiction

In some instances,an alcohol-sensitizing drug called disulfiram (Antabuse) may help prevent you from drinking. Disulfiram won’t cure alcohol addiction, nor can it remove the compulsion to drink. But if you drink alcohol, the drug produces a physical reaction that includes flushing, nausea, vomiting and headaches.

Naltrexone (ReVia), a drug long known to block the good feelings of alcohol, reduces the urge to drink. Acamprosate (Campral) may also help you combat alcohol cravings. Unlike disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate don’t make you feel sick soon after taking a drink.

Other alcohol addiction treatments include Injected medication like Vivitrol. Vivitrol is a version of the drug naltrexone and is injected once a month by a health care professional. Although similar medication can be taken in pill form, the injectable version of the drug may be easier for people recovering from alcohol dependence to use consistently.

Additional Treatments

Additional Treatments for Alcohol Addiction

In some instances,an alcohol-sensitizing drug called disulfiram (Antabuse) may help prevent you from drinking. Disulfiram won’t cure alcohol addiction, nor can it remove the compulsion to drink. But if you drink alcohol, the drug produces a physical reaction that includes flushing, nausea, vomiting and headaches.

Naltrexone (ReVia), a drug long known to block the good feelings of alcohol, reduces the urge to drink. Acamprosate (Campral) may also help you combat alcohol cravings. Unlike disulfiram, naltrexone and acamprosate don’t make you feel sick soon after taking a drink.

Other alcohol addiction treatments include Injected medication like Vivitrol. Vivitrol is a version of the drug naltrexone and is injected once a month by a health care professional. Although similar medication can be taken in pill form, the injectable version of the drug may be easier for people recovering from alcohol dependence to use consistently.

Inpatient Alcohol Treatment

Inpatient Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Alcohol addiction sometimes occurs along with other mental health disorders. You may need inpatient treatment which includes psychological counseling (psychotherapy), medications, or other treatment for depression, anxiety or another mental health condition. Counseling and therapy for groups and individuals support recovery from the psychological aspects of alcohol addiction. You may also benefit from couples or family therapy — family support can be an important part of the recovery process.

Learning skills and establishing a treatment plan is an important part of alcohol addiction recovery. This usually involves alcohol-abuse specialists. It may include goal setting, behavior modification techniques, use of self-help manuals, counseling and follow-up care at a treatment center.

With alcohol addiction, continuing support Is key. Aftercare programs and support groups help people recovering from alcohol addiction or alcohol abuse to stop drinking, manage relapses and cope with necessary lifestyle changes. This may include medical or psychological care or attending a support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous.

Outpatient Alcohol Treatment

Outpatient Alcohol Addiction Treatment

For patients with mild-to-moderate alcohol withdrawal syndrome, characterized by symptoms such as hand tremor, perspiration, heart palpitation, restlessness, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting, outpatient detoxification is as safe and effective as inpatient detoxification and it is much less time consuming and costs less than inpatient .

The patient can also continue to functionrelatively normally and maintain employment as well as family and social relationships.In order to participate in outpatient detox and / or alcohol treatment, an individual must be ambulatory, have a low risk for withdrawal complications, and have a strong support system consisting of family members or significant others.

If you believe that you or a loved one needs help, please contact us by calling (888)200-4926. Our addiction specialists will arrange for a free assessment, answer any questions you may have and provide you with the resources to set you on the road to recovery. In most cases, we can admit new patients within 24 hours of the initial contact.

You and your loved ones do not have to keep hurting. Contact us today to start the rest of your life in a positive way.